Extraordi-berries...

This section contains critical information about strawberries: varieties, planting, calories, vitamins, minerals, etc. Anything that would make you appreciate growing and consuming strawberries.

Cultivation

Source: Wikipedia.

Strawberry cultivars vary widely in size, color, flavor, shape, degree of fertility, season of ripening, liability to disease and constitution of plant.On average, a strawberry has about 200 seeds on its external membrane.Some vary in foliage, and some vary materially in the relative development of their sexual organs. In most cases, the flowers appear hermaphroditic in structure, but function as either male or female.For purposes of commercial production, plants are propagated from runners and, in general, distributed as either bare root plants or plugs. Cultivation follows one of two general models—annual plasticulture,[10] or a perennial system of matted rows or mounds.Greenhouses produce a small amount of strawberries during the off season.

The bulk of modern commercial production uses the plasticulture system. In this method, raised beds are formed each year, fumigated, and covered with plastic to prevent weed growth and erosion. Plants, usually obtained from northern nurseries, are planted through holes punched in this covering, and irrigation tubing is run underneath. Runners are removed from the plants as they appear, in order to encourage the plants to put most of their energy into fruit development. At the end of the harvest season, the plastic is removed and the plants are plowed into the ground.

Because strawberry plants more than a year or two old begin to decline in productivity and fruit quality, this system of replacing the plants each year allows for improved yields and denser plantings.However, because it requires a longer growing season to allow for establishment of the plants each year, and because of the increased costs in terms of forming and covering the mounds and purchasing plants each year, it is not always practical in all areas.

The other major method, which uses the same plants from year to year growing in rows or on mounds, is most common in colder climates.It has lower investment costs, and lower overall maintenance requirements.Yields are typically lower than in plasticulture.

Another method uses a compost sock. Plants grown in compost socks have been shown to produce significantly higher oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC), flavonoids, anthocyanins, fructose, glucose, sucrose, malic acid, and citric acid than fruit produced in the black plastic mulch or matted row systems. Similar results in an earlier 2003 study conducted by the US Dept of Agriculture, at the Agricultural Research Service, in Beltsville Maryland, confirms how compost plays a role in the bioactive qualities of two strawberry cultivars.

Strawberries plants ornament
Nutrients

Source: Wikipedia

One serving (100g) of strawberries contains approximately 33 kilocalories, is an excellent source of vitamin C, a good source of manganese, and provides several other vitamins and dietary minerals in lesser amounts.Strawberries contain a modest amount of essential unsaturated fatty acids in the achene (seed) oil.

strawberries displays at market

Vitamins include:

  1. Thiamine
  2. Riboflavin
  3. Niacine
  4. Pantothenic acid
  5. Vitamin B
  6. Folate
  7. Chloline.
  8. Vitamin C
  9. Vitamin E
  10. IVitamin K

Minerals include:

  1. Calcium
  2. Iron
  3. Magnesium
  4. Manganese
  5. Phosphorus
  6. potassium
  7. Sodium
  8. Zinc

Some people experience an anaphylactoid reaction to eating strawberries. The most common form of this reaction is oral allergy syndrome, but symptoms may also mimic hay fever or include dermatitis or hives, and, in severe cases, may cause breathing problems.